Tiny Magnet Ingestion Can Even Be Fatal

product liability lawyers

A number of recent recalls have involved tiny magnets that can be ingested by children causing serious injuries. New data also seems to indicate to personal injury lawyers that ingestion of these magnets can not only injure the child, but can also be fatal.

A number of recent recalls have involved tiny magnets that can be ingested by children causing serious injuries.  New data also seems to indicate to personal injury attorneys that ingestion of these magnets can not only injure the child, but can also be fatal.

The danger arises when a small magnet that comes with a toy becomes detached.  A child may be drawn to the round shiny magnet, and put it in his or her mouth.  Accidental ingestion can cause the magnet to be lodged in the child’s intestines, where it can cause intestinal perforation.  This is a serious condition, and can even cause death of the child, unless an emergency surgery is performed.  In most cases, the magnet can only be removed after performing the surgery.

Researchers from the Louisiana State University Health Center recently found that more than 79% of children who were involved in magnet ingestion accidents, and swallowed neodymium magnets had to undergo surgery or other invasive procedure in order to remove the magnet.  These invasive procedures include endoscopic procedures.  The difference when a child swallows a magnet and when he swallows any other object is that in most other cases, the other object is eliminated naturally through the system.  Researchers found that in 31% of the cases of magnet ingestion, the child was treated using surgery, while in 43% of the cases, a second invasive procedure was also performed.

The researchers found that in only 21% of the cases, the child was treated by pumping the stomach or observation.

This is one more reason for parents to be extremely cautious when they have these magnet-containing toys lying around the house.  These risks arise not just with the magnets that come with children’s toys, but also with magnet desktop toys for adults.  Very often, parents don’t realize that magnets from these adult desktop toys can also be ingested by children with serious health consequences.

 

One of our Meeting Locations: The Reeves Law Group 1 World Trade Center #800, Long Beach, CA 90831 (562) 528-3135

Trampolines Recalled Due to Injury Hazards

personal injury lawyers

The Consumer Product Safety Commission recently announced a recall of more than 23,000 trampolines because of injury risks.

Parents of children who frequently play on trampolines have more safety issues to worry about.  The Consumer Product Safety Commission recently announced a recall of more than 23,000 trampolines because of injury risks.  That comes on top of a recommendation by a pediatric group against using trampolines altogether.

The recall includes more than 23,400 trampolines that were made in China.  According to the Consumer Product Safety Commission, these trampolines were sold exclusively at Sports Authority stores across the country.

The problem seems to be that the trampoline’s metal legs can move out of position, while the children are using the trampolines.  This poses a serious risk that the jumping area may be punctured.  Children may suffer puncture wounds, lacerations and cuts and bruises.

The Sports Authority company models that are included in this recall were sold in April 2007 and May 2012.

Child safety experts and personal injury attorneys have been very concerned about the safety of trampolines.  Earlier this year, the American Academy of Pediatrics warned parents against using trampolines at home.  According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, jumping on trampolines poses a serious injury risk to a child, and most of the safeguards and other devices that are currently being used to keep children safe on trampolines, do not guarantee prevention of injury.

The use of trampolines at home has increased around the country, as these have become more affordable.  According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, however, the incidence of injuries involving trampoline use have been consistently high.  In 2009, which is the last year for which statistics are available, there were as many as 70 trampoline -related injuries per 100,000 children recorded in the country.  In all these cases, the children were between below 4 years of age.  Among children between the age of 5 and 14, the injury rate was approximately 160 trampoline-related injuries per 100,000 people.  That year, there were a total of 90,000 injuries related to trampolines.

 

Meeting Location
The Reeves Law Group
43141 Business Center Pkwy #200a
Lancaster, CA 93535
(661) 202-3142

 

Minimal Influence of “July Effect” on Spine Surgery

july effect

For years now, personal injury attorneys have known that certain months of the year like July are the worst possible times to have surgery.

For years now, personal injury attorneys have known that certain months of the year like July are the worst possible times to have surgery, because of the arrival of new medical residents which increases the risk of medical errors.  However, persons in line for spinal surgery may not necessarily have these concerns.  The research finds that there is no proof to support any kind of negative “July Effect” on patients due for spine surgery.

The findings come from a study conducted by researchers at Mayo Clinic in Rochester Minnesota, where doctors looked at whether the so-called “July Effect” had any influence on the safety of patients due for spinal surgery.  The July Effect refers to a phenomenon in which there is an increase in surgical and medical errors in hospitals and healthcare facilities in the month of July.

That increase in medical errors is linked to the sudden influx of new medical residents, who join internships in the month of July.  Teaching hospitals also take on fellows during the month, and many doctors believe that July is the worst possible time of the year to be admitted into a hospital.

The Mayo Clinic researchers examined data involving nearly 1 million patients, who had undergone spinal surgery between 2001 and 2008.  Fortunately, they found that the month in which these patients underwent the spinal surgery had little effect on their recovery and rehabilitation rates.  There was a slight increase in negative outcomes in teaching hospitals, but the increase was not significant enough to actually establish the influence of the July Effect.

The researchers broadly found that the rates of deaths and complications after spinal surgery did not vary according to the month in which the surgery was conducted.

 

Meeting Location
The Reeves Law Group
3890 11th St, PMB 17
Riverside, CA 92501
(951) 324-5174

 

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